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Cardiovascular Disease and Women's Health


By Dr. Phillip Harston


Cardiovascular disease kills more US women than all forms of cancer combined. In the video below, Dr. Phillip Harston of Randolph OB/GYN appears on WCNC-TV’s “Charlotte Today” program to discuss this important health concern.



Click on image above to play Dr. Harston's interview on
Charlotte Today.

Here are some key facts:

• 4% of women die of breast cancer, 40% of cardiovascular disease.

• 75% of bad cholesterol originates in the liver and other cells. Be sure to have your doctor measure the cholesterol levels in your blood.

• Important numbers: LDL - bad cholesterol HDL - good cholesterol

• Estrogen raises HDL and is partially responsible for pre-menopausal women having lower potential for heart disease. After menopause, that protection decreases.

• Women who have a positive family history and those near menopause should have advanced lipid testing (not just HDL/LDL).

• Advanced lipid testing includes particle numbers for Lpa and CPR.

• Diet and exercise continue to play a significant role in reducing cholesterol levels

• 67% of American women have a BMI (body mass index) greater than 25, signaling obesity.

• Cardiovascular mortality fell by 31% from 1998 to 2008 due to improvements in health care and women’s greater awareness

• 20% of patients smoke cigarettes, which also increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as cancer and other illnesses.

To learn more about your cardiovascular condition, schedule an appointment with me or other skilled physicians at Randolph OB/GYN using our online contact form or calling 704-333-4104.

 
Dr. Harston
The belief that "All People are Created Equal" is apparent in the way Dr. Harston relates to his patients. He has been a medical team volunteer on mission trips.
See Dr. Harston's bio page here.
 

women's healthy diet
A healthy diet is a valuable component of maintaining good cholesterol levels. Below is an illustration of cholesterol build-up in the bloodstream.
Cardiovascular disease in women's health